Location:
 

Analysing the French Revolution Third Edition (print and digital)

Analysing the French Revolution Third Edition (print and digital)
AUTHOR(S):
Michael Adcock
REGION:
Victoria
LEVELS:
Year 12
SUBJECT AREA:
History
EDITION:
3rd Edition
ISBN:
9781107506442
PUBLICATION DATE:
20/07/2015
Price:   AUD $62.95
Request more information
This title includes the following components
Print PDF Textbook Interactive Textbook
Preview
Interactive Textbook
Title information
Included components
Contents
Sample pages
The complete series
About the authors

The Analysing Revolutions series now includes new sources and up-to-date exam-style questions, Interactive Textbooks that bring history to life and a new American Revolution title. These full-colour editions continue to provide the very best support for VCE studies, as students develop a broad and detailed understanding of the process of revolution, and analyse and reflect upon the political, social and economic causes and consequences.

  • A range of engaging sources for analysis, including eyewitness accounts, visual representations and primary documents, combined with compelling narrative passages to cover the new VCE study design for implementation in 2016.
  • Opportunities to explore arguments and perspectives from a range of historians by introducing students to current and past scholarship.
  • A wide variety of analysis activities and focus questions enhance understanding and help develop the key skills required to think like an historian.
  • Chapter summaries and exam-style extended-response questions help students consolidate and reflect on their learning, in order to prepare fully for SACs and the exam.
  • The included Interactive Textbook offers interactive activities for student revision as well as a range of other rich content.

Education Publishing Awards Australia 2016 highly commended - Student Resource - Senior - English/Humanities/Arts/PE



Watch our workshop

Print
Print
The text delivered in print format.
PDF Textbook
PDF Textbook
The downloadable PDF version of the student text enables students to take notes, highlight key passages, and bookmark pages. It is downloaded from Cambridge GO using the unique 16-character code that is included with the purchase of the Print Textbook and the Interactive Textbook.
Interactive Textbook
Interactive Textbook
The online version of the student text delivers a host of interactive features to enhance the teaching and learning experience of the student text. It is accessed online through Cambridge GO using a unique 16-character code supplied with the Print Textbook, or available for purchase separately as a digital-only option.

The Interactive Textbook is available as a calendar-year subscription. Your subscription term is defined as follows: if activation occurs between January and July of this year, subscription concludes on 31 December this year. If activation occurs between August and December of this year, subscription concludes on 31 December the following year.

About the author
Acknowledgements
Foreword by Professor Peter McPhee, AM
French Revolutionary governments at a glance
Hot to use this textbook

Summary of key events, 1774 to October 1789


1 The political order in France before the revolution
1.1 What were the elements that made up the King’s authority?
1.2 Limits to the King’s power
1.3 The contradictions and inefficiencies of the monarchy
1.4 The importance of public perceptions of the King
1.5 Significant Individual: King Louis XVI  


2 The social order in France before the revolution  
2.1 The corporate society and privilege  
2.2 The culture of deference: Respect for your ‘betters’
2.3 The three estates


3 Significant ideas: The influence of the Enlightenment  
3.1 Historians’ points of view: Did the Enlightenment help create a revolutionary situation in France?
3.2 The main strands of Enlightenment thought
3.3 Varied political beliefs
3.4 Analysing the impact of the Enlightenment

 
4 New popular movements and significant ideas before the revolution  
4.1 What were the growing expectations of the bourgeoisie in the Third Estate?  
4.2 Historians debate the role of the bourgeoisie
4.3 Other social forces: The challenge from the liberal nobility


5 How France’s financial crisis became a political crisis, 1774–1789
5.1 The making of a crisis: The nation’s financial problem
5.2 Significant Individual: Queen Marie-Antoinette
5.3 The old regime tries to reform itself
5.4 The financial crisis becomes a political crisis
5.5 Consulting the nation: The Books of Grievances (Cahiers de doleances)
5.6 Significant Individual: Phillipe, Duc d’Orleans


6 How the political crisis became a revolution, 1789
6.1 The hopes and grievances of working people, 1788–89
6.2 Conflict over the Estates-General
6.3 Significant Individual: Emmanuel Joseph Sieyès
6.4 Paris in a ferment: The tense days of July 1789
6.5 The capture of the Bastille


7 The revolutionary events of 1789
7.1 How was the revolution consolidated in 1789?
7.2 Events: The peasant revolt, July and August 1789
7.3 Events: The Night of Patriotic Delirium, 4 August 1789
7.4 Events: The women’s march to Versailles, October 1789


Summary of key events, October 1789 to November 1795


8 The role of significant individuals, 1789–1791
8.1 What role do leaders play in a revolution?
8.2 Significant Individual: The Marquis de Lafayette
8.3 The roles of other leaders in the French Revolution
8.4 Significant Individual: Camille Desmoulins
8.5 Significant Individual: Comte de Mirabeau
8.6 Significant Individual: Jean-Sylvain Bailly


9 The development of significant revolutionary ideas, 1789–1791
9.1 Ideas: The Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen
9.2 The principles of the men and women of 1789
9.3 Key concepts of the Declaration


10 The role of popular movements, 1789–1791
10.1 What is meant by a revolutionary ‘movement’?
10.2 The formation of a revolutionary movement in France
10.3 Do leaders control the revolutionary movement?
10.4 How did the revolutionary movement express its ideas?


11 Creating a new society, 1789–1791
11.1 The historians’ debate about the creation of a new society in France
11.2 The key principles of reform: Reason and equality
11.3 The rationalisation of administration
11.4 The creation of a fair and accessible judicial system
11.5 Did the revolution improve life for most people?


12 Sources of disunity in the revolution, 1789–1791
12.1 The administrative reorganisation of the Catholic Church
12.2 The Civil Constitution of the Clergy, August 1789 to July 1790
12.3 The opposition from the clergy, October and November 1790
12.4 The making of France’s Constitution, 1789–91
12.5 The revolution divided against itself, 1790–91
12.6 Significant Individual: Lafayette suffers from the tensions within the revolutionary movement
12.7 Significant Individual: The King accepts the Constitution, September 1791


13 The revolutionary events of 1792
13.1 How did foreign powers put pressure on the revolution in August 1791?
13.2 New leaders, new challenges: The Legislative Assembly, 1 October 1791
13.3 Dangerous solutions: The option of international war
13.4 The experience of war radicalizes the revolution
13.5 Significant Individual: A new leader and organiser: Georges-Jacques Danton    


14 Creating the new society, 1792 1794
14.1 The new political team: The National Convention
14.2 Creating the new society: The blueprint
14.3 The new society: The structures of everyday life
14.4 The new citizen: The republic of virtue


15 The new society: Challenges and responses, 1792–1794
15.1 The financial challenge: The crisis in revolutionary finances
15.2 The military challenge: International war
15.3 The economic challenge: The food crisis
15.4 The military crisis: Civil war  
15.5 The political challenge: The Federalist revolt
15.6 The psychological challenge: Assassinations in Paris  
15.7 Responses: ‘Revolutionary government’ and Terror
15.8 The Great Terror


16 Significant individuals: The role of Maximilien de Robespierre, 1792–1794  
16.1 Significant Individual: A leader in a time of crisis: Maximilien de Robespierre
16.2 Robespierre’s qualities as a leader
16.3 Robespierre’s relationship with the revolutionary movement  
16.4 The ‘professional revolutionary’
16.5 The political use of paranoia
16.6 The role of other leaders in the revolution, 1792–94
16.7 Significant Individual: Georges-Jacques Danton
16.8 Significant Individual: Jean-Paul Marat


17 Popular movements: The role of the sans-culottes in the French Revolution, 1792–1795
17.1 Who were the sans-culottes?
17.2 The Jacobins and the sans-culottes?
17.3 Who were les enrages?


18 Popular movements: The role of women in the French Revolution, 1789–1794
18.1 The contribution of women and their involvement in revolutionary activity  
18.2 The historical debate: Why did women participate in the revolution?  
18.3 Rediscovering the many political roles of women
18.4 Significant Individual: Olympe de Gouges and the rights of women
18.5 Significant Individual: Women’s activist Anne-Pauline Léon  
18.6 Significant Individual: Women’s activist Claire Lacombe 2
18.7 The repression of revolutionary women


19 The final settlement: The conservative republic of 1795
19.1 The fall of the Jacobin government in Thermidor, July 1794  
19.2 Significant Individual: The overthrow of Robespierre in Thermidor
19.3 The representation of Robespierre over time
19.4 The Thermidorian reaction
19.5 Significant Individual: Boissy d’Anglas
19.5 The Constitution of 1795: A return to moderation


20 Historical interpretations
20.1 How to write about historical interpretations
20.2 Comparing different views of the French Revolution


Glossary
Index


We want to give you the opportunity to view sample pages of our titles so it's easier for you to make decisions.

The Analysing Revolutions series now includes new sources and up-to-date exam-style questions, Interactive Textbooks that bring history to life and a new American Revolution title. These full-colour editions continue to provide the very best support for VCE studies, as students develop a broad and detailed understanding of the process of revolution, and analyse and reflect upon the political, social and economic causes and consequences.

Education Publishing Awards Australia 2016 highly commended - Student Resource - Senior - English/Humanities/Arts/PE



Watch our workshop

ALL TITLES IN SERIES:
ISBN 9781107506473
INCLUDED COMPONENTS
Print Interactive Textbook PDF Textbook
AUD $62.95
Request more information
ISBN 9781108734202
INCLUDED COMPONENTS
PDF Textbook Interactive Textbook
AUD $49.95
Request more information
ISBN 9781107506459
INCLUDED COMPONENTS
Print PDF Textbook Interactive Textbook
AUD $62.95
Request more information
ISBN 9781108734226
INCLUDED COMPONENTS
Interactive Textbook PDF Textbook
AUD $49.95
Request more information
ISBN 9781107506442
INCLUDED COMPONENTS
Print PDF Textbook Interactive Textbook
AUD $62.95
Request more information
ISBN 9781108704762
INCLUDED COMPONENTS
PDF Textbook Interactive Textbook
AUD $49.95
Request more information
ISBN 9781107506435
INCLUDED COMPONENTS
Print PDF Textbook Interactive Textbook
AUD $62.95
Request more information
ISBN 9781108705059
INCLUDED COMPONENTS
PDF Textbook Interactive Textbook
AUD $49.95
Request more information
Michael Adcock

is a History teacher at a school in Melbourne. He is also a lecturer, author and tour guide who specialises in the social and cultural history of France. He regularly presents illustrated lectures for the History Teachers’ Association of Victoria, Modern History Seminars (Sydney) and the National Gallery of Victoria. His published works focus on the history of the French Revolution, and includes a recent work on the Enlightenment. He is also the tour leader for Academy Travel (Sydney), and conducts residential study tours in French history in Paris, and in the Russian Revolution in St Petersburg and Moscow.